Is death by firing squad really instantaneous? Not necessarily

Posted by Nate Wek on

In Utah, the death penalty can now be carried out by firing squad, but only as a backup method if lethal injection drugs are unavailable. The state’s governor signed in the new law amidst a nation-wide shortage of these drugs, and other states are eyeing similar execution methods. Judy Woodruff talks to Andrew Novak of George Mason University and Jennifer Dobner of The Salt Lake Tribune.

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Is Ted Cruz Allowed To Run Since He Was Born In Canada?

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Texas Sen. Ted Cruz became the first major candidate to declare for president, but some question whether he's eligible since he was born in Canada. Legal scholars, though, believe he can.

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Mobile Engagement in the Era of App Overload

Posted by PBS Idea Lab on

These days, there seems to be an app for everything. Voice-enabled pizza ordering? Check. An app that says “Yo?” Check. As of today, Apple’s App Store and the Google Play store are home to over 1.4 million apps, each!

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A Word Of Advice To Baseball Players: Sneeze Carefully

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The Toronto Blue Jays' Kevin Pillar was sidelined after straining an oblique muscle during a violent sneeze. Other players have gotten hurt while hopping out of a truck or climbing out of a hot tub.

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Murder City Earns Its Name In 'Blood Runs Green'

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Before Beulah Annan or Leopold and Loeb, another murder became a Chicago sensation. Scott Simon speaks with Gillian O'Brien, author of Blood Runs Green: The Murder that Transfixed Gilded Age Chicago.

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Bring Back The Firing Squad, Says Utah Lawmaker

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State Rep. Paul Ray says states like Utah that have the death penalty need an alternative to execution drugs that are no longer available.

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Ancient Physicians Struggle to Understand Cancer

Posted by Nate Wek on

Watch a clip from the upcoming film, "Cancer: The Emperor of Maladies."

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Museum Asks Visitors To Listen To New York's Buildings

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Iconic architecture, long a subject for academics and designers, is being explored with sound in a new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York.

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Clinton Says She Didn't Think Private Email Would Be 'An Issue'

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton answered questions Tuesday about her use of a private email account. Correspondents Tamara Keith and Mara Liasson join NPR's Melissa Block.

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Rapid City Residents Will Vote on Rushmore Plaza Civic Center Project Proposal Tomorrow

Posted by Nate Wek on

Rapid City residents will vote on a proposed $180-million expansion to the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center on Tuesday March 10. This project would renovate and expand the current building, as the new facility could hold up to 19,000 people if needed.

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Why animal groups pushed for circus elephant retirement

Posted by PBS Newhour on

Starting in 2018, elephants will no longer be a part of the circus under the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey big top. The company is giving up the fight with animal rights groups who have criticized elephant training practices as cruel. Gwen Ifill speaks with Wayne Pacelle of the Humane Society about the significance of this move and who else played a role in the Ringling Bros. decision.

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Hillary Clinton Asks State Dept. To Release Her Emails To The Public

Posted by NPR News on

Responding to concerns over her use of a personal email account to conduct official business while in office, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says she wants the public to have access to her emails. The State Department says it will review messages for possible release.

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8 Reasons You're Losing Sleep

Posted by Next Avenue on

As if there weren’t enough things keeping you tossing and turning each night, here’s a new one: Using short-wave, blue light-emitting e-readers, like the iPad, iPhone, Nook Color, Kindle and Kindle Fire before bedtime can make it harder to fall asleep, according to a December 2014 study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

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The Blind Woman Who Saw Rain

Posted by Nate Wek on

Imagine a world that is completely black. You can't see a thing — unless something happens to move. You can see the rain falling from the sky, the steam coming from your coffee cup, a car passing by on the street.

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Public Urged to Drive with Caution with Bighorn Sheep Present

Posted by SDPB on

The South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks is asking the public to drive with caution in the Deadwood area.

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