Savor Dakota Extra: Harvest Eats

Last Updated by Heather Benson on
The family of Michelle Andrews making the most of time in the combine
Michelle Andrews

Harvest season is upon us and for many South Dakota families, that means long hours and family meals that are more likely to happen in a tractor cab than at the dinner table.  We asked a few farm families to share their harvest meal stories with us.  We'd love to hear your stories too!  Comment below or email us at melissa.hamersma@sdpb.org

Michelle Andrews, Rural Beresford

"Grandma Elva (my husband’s grandma) brought a table and folding chairs to the field. She made everyone get out of the tractor or combine and sit in the field and eat together. Those days are sadly gone. Now it has to be anything that can be eaten one handed, while driving for my crew (sandwich, wrap, etc) and warm food is always appreciated.

On that note though both Tornberg farms and our Andrews farm supply meals for the crew. There is always a noon meal together on non-harvest/haying/chopping/planting season. That's getting more and more rare on a farm.

MichelleAndrewsMealPrep.jpegAndrews family preparing a harvest feast!

The combine crew is getting egg bake muffins, sausage, fruit and french toast for supper-as ordered/prepared by this crew.

Andrews Ride with Dad.jpegAndrews family riding with Dad, hauling grain.

They eat whatever the crew eats :) so typically the meal is kid friendly also."

Brian Jensen, Rural Beresford

“Anything homemade floats my boat.”

His wife made this recipe from Easy Recipe Guide

Crockpot Chicken and Stuffing Recipe

You’ll Need:

4 defrosted chicken breasts.
1 large can or cream of chicken soup.
2 boxes of stuffing mix.
1 cup of sour cream.
1 small package of frozen green beans.

How to:

Place the chicken breasts in a sprayed crock pot then add two boxes of stuffing mix.
In a medium bowl, mix together the soup and sour cream. Pour the mixture over the stuffing and chicken.
Add a layer of the frozen green beans then pour a cup of water.
Cook the chicken for 4 hours on high or 7 to 8 hours on low.

"Easy, peasy and yummy! This chicken and stuffing is just awesome. You can put it on the heat, go to work and come back home to find a delicious meal ready for you!"

Helene Carlson, rural Beresford

Helene Carlson.jpegThe lunch spread for the Carlson harvest crew.

"I made part of our meals in May this year and froze them. I put them in the crockpot before we leave for the field. We have cold lunches each day - sandwiches on hearty whole wheat bread with meat and specialty cheese, spring pasta salad with garden tomatoes, or cottage cheese with tomatoes, celery with peanut butter, banana, or grapes, cashews, frozen Snickers (fun size), peeled hard cooked eggs, peanut butter star cookies, banana bread (or Fig Newtons). Maybe not all of this everyday, but this is my assortments."

Becky Pauly

"I certainly remember bringing lunch to Dad and Grandpa Soph in the field.  I remember Grandpa Marge made hotdish and would bring it wrapped in towels and in the trunk in a box so it wouldn't spill. She also always had sides, too...buttered buns, coffee, water, jello, etc...and of course some form of dessert. She always had sandwiches and lunches packed to leave with them for their mid-afternoon "lunch".

I grew up eating breakfast, lunch, dinner, lunch, supper and another snack/dessert before bed. I know the lunches aren't quite as extravagant as they used to be. Grandma Marge was an excellent cook and she loved feeding the crew, regardless if it was in the field or in her home. I learned a lot from her, but one thing I learned was that we always feed those that come to visit, regardless of the time of day or whether you expect them or not!"

Katie Ogren-Zeeb, rural Langford

Zeeb.jpgKatie's son enjoying a fall meal in the cow pasture

"For the fall cattle checks my mom has been known to bring beef stew or pasta and homemade pies to the pasture. This is truly the look of pure happiness."

Lisa Sorensen

"When I grew up, we would go with my Mom or grandma and take lunch or coffee and snacks to the field for our Dad, grandpa or uncle's. It's would be sandwiches, bars cookies and always coffee in a thermos. Those are wonderful memories.

And a cute side note: this morning my husband and 3yr old son left to go farming with my brother in law. My husband will drive the grain truck and my son will be with my in-laws. My mother-in-law will take Alex out to see the combine, tractors and trucks. She said they could make a little sack lunch and take it with them. The traditions continue! My son was a very excited boy, this morning!"
 
Melissa Sievers, rural Beresford
13418431_10154315301768919_5142801085437313955_o.jpegMelissa's family enjoying a harvest dinner on the go.

Typically when I take food to the field for my husband it needs to be something that can be eaten on the go.  So, I like to make hot sandwiches like grilled ham and cheese.  Occasionally I might take time to try to make a calzone or pastie of some sort.  

Other days we are able to take time to sit on a tail gate or in the car and eat a meal together.  On this day we had chicken available, so I made chicken strips.  Something easy and filling for hubby and appealing to our son.  Our culinary creation isn’t always 5 star, we often make use of whatever is available at that moment.  My son thought that daddy might like bacon, so we made that too.  A remaining bell pepper got sliced up in order to round out the meal a bit.

A mandatory item to have in stock as a treat each season: jolly ranchers.  Hard candy is a welcome treat as my husband rolls through the field.

Margaret Rigg
"Afternoon lunch was a cold meat sandwich on home made bread, cake or cookies, a thermos of coffee for my Dad and a jug of cold koolaid for the brothers or who ever did not drink the coffee.
 
I remember once that I did not come back with all of the tupperware glasses. Mom thought they were gone forever. Not so. They were found the next winter when someone was putting straw in the pig pen. Those glasses had fallen in the windrow of straw, then thru the baler, stacked in the haymow and finally thrown down into the pig pen and opened up and found. They were not in the best shape but after soaking in hot water they were back into their shape and even the lids that went on them fit!"
 
Talisha Fahlberg
"This was us earlier this week!"
14859652_10157911817885019_4046759864760486431_o.jpg
14884541_10157911811095019_7666900583125787353_o.jpgLunch with Talisha's family.